“Greener World”, is written by Sean Hackett, a 7th Grade Connecticut State Science Fair finalist (2011) from E.C. Adams Middle School. Let’s encourage broader support for our high achieving students by celebrating their success. Enjoy!

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For my science fair project, I studied the effect of salt on the amount of hydrogen produced by the […]

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A long long time ago, Sir Isaac Newton (1643 – 1727) changed our understanding of the Universe by enumerating his Three Laws of Motion. What are Newton’s Laws of Motion? What do they mean? Can you prove Newton’s Laws? You can explore answers to these questions with Jameson Kief’s riveting account of his experience with […]

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Why Science is pleased to announce the  23rd Annual New Haven Science Fair is taking place on May 14th – 16th at  Floyd Little Athletic Center, Hillhouse High School (480 Sherman Pkwy, New Haven, CT 06511) .

The New Haven Science Fair is particularly special to Why Science because we share New Haven Public Schools commitment […]

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A much-discussed example of the difficulties associated with allocating credit between junior and senior researchers was the 1967 discovery by Jocelyn Bell, then a 24-year-old graduate student, of pulsars. Over the previous two years, Bell and several other students, under the supervision of Bell’s thesis advisor, Anthony Hewish, had built a 4.5-acre radiotelescope to investigate

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Many scientists get involved in the field primarily out of a genuine intellectual curiosity that needs to be sated. Often times we are working with limited budgets, possibly utilizing grants or other public/private means in order to further our understanding of a particular subject. With many of these pursuits the financial rewards might not be great, and possibly also due to a historical precedent this is very pronounced in the scientific community, being awarded credit and being provided with recognition for one’s findings is a very big deal. Frankly it is a big deal in every profession so here is a little life lesson we can all learn from.

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Don is a first-year graduate student applying to the National Science Foundation for a predoctoral fellowship. His work in a lab where he did a rotation project was later carried on successfully by others, and it appears that a manuscript will be prepared for publication by the end of the summer. However, the fellowship […]

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Paula, a young assistant professor, and two graduate students have been working on a series of related experiments for the past several years. During that time, the experiments have been written up in various posters, abstracts, and meeting presentations. Now it is time to write up the experiments for publication, but the students and Paula […]

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May is a second-year graduate student preparing the written portion of her qualifying exam. She incorporates whole sentences and paragraphs verbatim from several published papers. She does not use quotation marks, but the sources are suggested by statements like “(see . . . for more details).” The faculty on the qualifying exam committee note inconsistencies […]

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Francine was just months away from finishing her Ph.D. dissertation when she realized that something was seriously amiss with the work of a fellow graduate student, Sylvia. Francine was convinced that Sylvia was not actually making the measurements she claimed to be making. They shared the same lab, but Sylvia rarely seemed to be there. […]

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Ed, a fourth-year graduate student, was still several months away from finishing an ongoing research project when a new postdoc arrived from a laboratory doing similar work. After the two were introduced, Ed automatically asked about the work going on in the other lab and was surprised to hear that researchers there had successfully developed […]

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